Woods in the Books
Posted on by Stephanie on blog!, Elf Reads

Elf Reads: The Inquisitor’s Tale

Inq tale

About this book:

1242. On a dark night, travelers from across France cross paths at an inn and begin to tell stories of three children. Their adventures take them on a chase through France: they are taken captive by knights, sit alongside a king, and save the land from a farting dragon. On the run to escape prejudice and persecution and save precious and holy texts from being burned, their quest drives them forward to a final showdown at Mont Saint-Michel, where all will come to question if these children can perform the miracles of saints.

Join William, an oblate on a mission from his monastery; Jacob, a Jewish boy who has fled his burning village; and Jeanne, a peasant girl who hides her prophetic visions. They are accompanied by Jeanne’s loyal greyhound, Gwenforte . . . recently brought back from the dead. Told in multiple voices, in a style reminiscent of The Canterbury Tales, our narrator collects their stories and the saga of these three unlikely allies begins to come together.

Posted on February 16, 2017 by Stephanie on blog!, Elf Reads

Elf Reads: The House on Palmer Road

Cover

About this book:
It is 1930s Singapore and war is raging in China and Europe. But for eight-year-old Sing and her nine brothers and sisters, life is carefree and fun at their wooden house in Palmer Road where they live with Mother, Father and Ah Seem. Join them as they go frog hunting, escape fierce guard geese, visit a ‘coolie room’, and head off on other exciting adventures in pre-war colonial Singapore.

This playful, fun-filled children’s book is based on the childhood experiences of 83-year-old first time author, Si-Hoe S.S., who is the ‘real’ Sing. In The House on Palmer Road, young readers will fall in love with the large but lovable family, and relive a magical though tumultuous time in Singapore’s past. Within the series of charming short stories, children will also gently encounter aspects of Singapore’s history through vividly-described landscapes, snatches of overheard conversations among the grown-ups, and the many people they ‘meet’, from itinerant hawkers to coolies and night soil men. The book is published with the support of the National Heritage Board.